The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware [Review]

Ruth Ware’s wildly popular novel is an exercise in internal anxiety reminiscent of Edgar Allan Poe – just much longer. The first-person narrator, Laura (“Lo”) Blacklock, is a journalist for a British travel magazine. She scores a plush assignment of sailing on the maiden voyage of a small luxury cruise ship/yacht owned by a rich … More The Woman in Cabin 10, by Ruth Ware [Review]

The Human Cure, by Tracy Auerbach [Review]

This is the most unique vampire story I’ve ever read or seen on the screen. Without spoiling anything, the principle vampire characters, Chase and Hunter Bardock, are part of a vampire family living in an underground compound in Queens. Both have traits that make them unusual among their kind, and that bring them closer to … More The Human Cure, by Tracy Auerbach [Review]

The Cerberus Affair, by Charlotte Valentine [review]

The baseline plot of The Cerberus Affair is immediately attention-getting and quickly draws the reader into the mystery. Catherine, a beautiful but sexless single mother of an adopted son, is a former journalist. At the same time her son is getting ready to go off to university, Catherine’s world is rocked by the news of … More The Cerberus Affair, by Charlotte Valentine [review]

The Parasite from Proto Space (and other stories), by Brett Petersen [Review]

This book of short stories is like the fever dream of a drug-addicted surrealist artist. The Parasite story (the first) has some elements of sci-fi, but lacks characters, a coherent story, an obstacle to be overcome or a goal to be achieved, and fails to even try to explain how an insect-like parasitic organism is … More The Parasite from Proto Space (and other stories), by Brett Petersen [Review]

Spider: Jelvia: Not Human (#3), by T. E. Kessler [Review]

I read book #1 in the Jelvia series (Holding out for a Hero) and now have jumped to the most recent installment, Spider. T.E. Kessler has created a unique world in which Humans live alongside a super-human race of Jelvia. This installment delves into the common fetishes and motivations of both races through the eyes … More Spider: Jelvia: Not Human (#3), by T. E. Kessler [Review]

The Café on Dream Street, by Adriane Brown [Review]

Adriane Brown’s novel, The Café on Dream Street, is a tortured tale of an immigrant from el Salvador, Felipe Sanchez, and his family, trying to make a life in a suburb of New York called Oakmont. The writer’s political bent is clear from the outset. The local cops are redneck anti-immigrant thugs, who terrorize the … More The Café on Dream Street, by Adriane Brown [Review]

Parabellum, by Greg Hickey [Review]

Parabellum begins with the grisly scene after a mass shooting at a Chicago beach. The rest of the book describes – in great detail – the lives of four characters identified only as “the student,” “the ex-athlete,” “the veteran,” and “the programmer.” The absence of names for these central characters is disconcerting, but we get … More Parabellum, by Greg Hickey [Review]